Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Slide Trigger Polishing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Jackson, CA
    Posts
    2,735

    Slide Trigger Polishing

    Slider Trigger Job



    From this!



    To this




    Tools needed:
    • 220g-600g wet dry sand paper (Without buffing wheel go to 1200g)
    • Buffing wheel with compound (Harbor Freight cheapo http://www.harborfreight.com/garage-...fer-94393.html ) or Dremel with buffing attachment.
    • Flat surface (Formica counter top, table saw top, etc.) MUST BE FLAT!
    • Purple or green locktite
    • WD-40
    • Oil/grease of your choice (Teflon)
    • YOU!
    Parts needed:
    • Trigger
    • Sear
    • One 10-32x 3/8th and one 8-32x 3/8th brass tip SS hex screws (Or two 10-32 3/8th depending on frame)
    • Trigger Springs (Your choice)
    • Hammer Lug (Your choice)




    To start get your sand paper and cut it into manageable sizes, then spray the pieces with WD-40 and let soak in the oil for 5 minutes. While this is soaking gather your parts, inspect the triggers contact points for damage or mill marks. This is what you will be trying to remove with the sand paper.

    For this demo let’s call the long top part of the trigger contact point 1 (CP-1), working down from CP 1 is the angle contact point where the sear rides, we’ll call this CP-2. CP-3 will be the medium length area below CP-2. CP-4 is the short area right behind the curved finger part.

    Tip #1: ALL CONTACT POINTS MUST REMAIN FLAT AND PARALEL WITH EACH OTHER. This is critical with CP-3 and CP-4. If you sand in a bow or angle down the length of the CP-3&4 will cause it to bind, hence the flat working surface.









    Sanding:
    With your 220g oiled sand paper start on CP-1. When possible, sand in the direction the trigger will travel “lengthwise” within the frame while keeping the trigger perpendicular to the surface. Keep even pressure on the trigger as not to take off too much material on to front or back. Remember to clean your sand paper with a squirt of WD40 ever now and then.

    Tip#2: Sand a few strokes then check your work. Your will see the area where material had been removed. Make sure this is area is even and flat.

    As soon as the mill marks disappear with the 220g sanding, move to a finer grit sandpaper. Continue sanding all 4 contact points on the trigger until they are flat and mill mark free.

    Tip#3: To sand CP-3 and CP-4 use the edge of your flat surface and pull the trigger laterally across the CP. This is the opposite direction you did for CP-1.

    Do this same sanding process to the sear. There are only two contact points needing sanding, the tip where it comes into contact with the trigger and the rear portion where the lug rest when cocked “sear catch.” (Some people polish the area in front of the sear catch. I feel there is no need o a cocker.)

    Polishing:
    If you have a polishing wheel, start with a heaver compound then transition to a fine compound. When done the contact point should look like chrome. I like to take the tip, of the polished sear, and slide it across all of the polished CP’s to check for smoothness.

    Tip#4: The part will get hot in your hands so have a cup of water handy to cool it off.

    Dremel polishing will work the same but may take longer to get the chrome appearance.
    If you do not have a polishing wheel or Dermel then use finer sand paper all the way down to 1200g then use automotive cream compound (fine) with a cloth.

    Brass tipped screws:
    Lightly sand and round the edges of the brass tips with 600g then take to the polishing wheel to finalize. Inseert them into your frame. I use Purple Permatex® (low strength) on the two set screws. Blue locktite is to strong and you will run the risk of stripping an allan head. Permatex® Low Strength Threadlocker PURPLE



    Tip#5: Clean your frame with hot soapy water then dry prior to assembly. This will remaove and grit and oil so the loctite will hold.

    The Hammer LUG:
    If not already polished, “most are rusty,” chuck it up in a drill and sand to a shiny finish then polish.




    Thing I have found through doing trigger jobs:
    • Dust anno bodies creates more friction on the top edge of the trigger plate than polished anno bodies.
    • If you are going to re-anno a body, remember to polish the area where the top of the trigger contacts the body. See photo
    • In most cases the sides of the trigger need no polishing, except with no-chromed versions like AKA. If they rusty clean and polish.
    • Make sure the valve retaining screw on the bottom of the body is not interfering with the trigger.



    Last edited by docfire; 02-14-2012 at 05:28 AM. Reason: update

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    186
    did you mean to say green loctite? That stuff wicks in and sets as strong as red. Its mainly for parts that are already fastened if I recall correctly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    675
    Why do you use WD-40 on the sandpaper instead of water?
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Wood View Post
    ooh look at that over there!!! Jeremy Salm riding a giant rainbow-coloured unicorn!!
    Virtus Et Peritia

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    761
    Something else I would do is get some 0.5" wide stick on Teflon tape and put it on the body in between it and the frame, this provided a zero resistance area for the trigger to run against
    will only make the best no crap or can't sleep
    C/F TRIGGERS AVAILABLE NOW
    http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v471/acidcustom/
    check out the link for parts available now
    http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v471/acidcustom/
    acidcustom@yahoo.com.au

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    761
    Quote Originally Posted by mephisto_mike View Post
    did you mean to say green loctite? That stuff wicks in and sets as strong as red. Its mainly for parts that are already fastened if I recall correctly.
    I agree that stuff sets rock hard and will not allow any adjustment, you can use wick in which is a screw adjustable locker, it alooows adjustment without breaking the locking

    Also what I always use on slide triggers is stick on teflon tape on the body where the trigger slides makes it butter smooth with a good polish job
    will only make the best no crap or can't sleep
    C/F TRIGGERS AVAILABLE NOW
    http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v471/acidcustom/
    check out the link for parts available now
    http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v471/acidcustom/
    acidcustom@yahoo.com.au

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    156
    Green loctite is penetrating grade iirc. From what I have heard the purple stuff is living hell, and is used to hold in cylinder sleeves on engines.
    I could be wrong, as loctite and permatex brands could be different colours/strengths.
    Pat.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Jackson, CA
    Posts
    2,735
    Quote Originally Posted by p_bpat View Post
    Green loctite is penetrating grade iirc. From what I have heard the purple stuff is living hell, and is used to hold in cylinder sleeves on engines.
    I could be wrong, as loctite and permatex brands could be different colours/strengths.
    Pat.

    Did not realize my mistake. Its Permatex® Low Strength Threadlocker PURPLE
    http://www.permatex.com/products/Aut...ker_PURPLE.htm

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winnetka, IL
    Posts
    1,041
    Do you have any recommendations on polishing the insides of the grip frame? I cam considering anodizing/powedercoatig a grip frame out of necessity, and am not sure how to polish the inside of the grip frame.
    CHICAGO DAMAGE, INC
    WISEGUYS
    Looking for Bonebrakes, Westwoods, Supercocker LE
    gun pics

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •